The Diary of Miss Louisa Jessie Campbell

Our tweets from Louisa are sadly drawing to a close as the remaining extracts getting a lot more sporadic from here on in. But what about Mr. Cotton? And what if you have no idea who he is or what we’re talking about?!
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Tweets from Louisa

If you follow us on Twitter you may have noticed the occasional tweet from “Louisa” now appearing in your timeline and you may be wondering whether she’s a new addition here at the Archives. Well… sort of…
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In Depth: The Ceramic Staircase

In both Dr Christopher Dresser and the Minton Connection and Minton Majolica: A Visual Feast of Victorian Opulence the Archive’s own source material provided an excellent jumping-off point from which these important aspects of Minton’s history could be explored in detail. In The Ceramic Staircase, however, the focal point for our latest discussion is instead one of the company’s major productions, an important design feature of the South Kensington (now the Victoria and Albert) Museum. Having yet to stumble across any records related to the Staircase we’re particularly grateful to Dr. Charlotte Drew, a Henry Moore Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at the University of Bristol, for bringing this magnificent installation to our attention – and in such detail too.
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Magnificent Majolica: The First

It’s time to introduce “Magnificent Majolica”, a new series where we focus on the opulence and exuberance of the Archive’s majolica designs. Every other month we’ll highlight one or more artworks from our special Art & Design folio as detailed images, galleries, or interactive comparisons. If you’d like to find out more about majolica and why it is synonymous with Minton you can do so through our In Depth introduction to the series.
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In Depth: Minton Majolica

Earlier this year we updated our online catalogue to include both a large collection of designs by Christopher Dresser and a folio box bursting with incredible majolica illustrations. Having adapted work found within the archive to help describe Dresser’s connection with Minton we have this time been able to call on the knowledge of Claire Blakey, former curator at The Potteries Museum & Art Gallery and speaker at this year’s Annual Archive Ceramics Lecture, to provide us with an in depth description of one of Minton’s great achievements.
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A Timeline of Tile Companies

Whilst the Minton Archive does contain some tile-related material it’s less than you might think, and for good reason. Encaustic tile manufacture began as part of Minton’s china business but over time the two entities would become distinct and eventually separate completely. Minton and Co. would continue to produce certain types of tile, as seen from records in the Archive, but the rights to produce encaustic and flooring tiles would be fought over by ex-business partners and Minton family members for some time.
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When Gaseliers Appear (Again!)

At the end of our last post we mentioned Minton Archive magic and boy, has it been working overtime since! We’ve not only found another gaselier design but also discovered all manner of other connections within the Archive and beyond, in some cases thanks to you, our readers. So, just one week later, it’s time for an update…
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When Gaseliers Appear

If you happen to follow us on Twitter you’ll have seen that on the day we published our pseudo-3D view from the International Exhibition of 1862 we also serendipitously discovered an illustration with a close resemblance to one of the pieces on display. These coincidences are starting to get a little spooky!
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Piku-Piku & the International Exhibition

No, we’re not about to uncover a new batch of PokéMinton hidden away in photographs of the International Exhibition of 1862. “Piku-Piku” actually means “twitching” in Japanese and, along with our feature image, might just give you a clue as to where this particular post is headed…
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Minton Patent Ovens, Part 3: Proof

In our Minton Patent Ovens series we’ve already examined the details of the patent behind the name and taken a closer look at some of the plans and drawings found in the Mintons Patent Ovens section of the catalogue. In this final post it’s time to find out whether the Patent Ovens were a success, both for Minton itself and for the other companies who adopted this new type of oven construction…
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